Woah, Baby! Pregnancy Discrimination Update

business babyRegular readers of this blog will know that we have written pretty extensively on Women in the Workplace and Pregnancy (First Comes Love, Then Comes Marriage, Then Comes Flex-Time and a Baby Carriage, The Maternal Profiling Debate Continues, to name a few). In 2008 we wrote about a new study that focused on trends in Pregnancy Discrimination. 10 years later we are still having problems. Continue reading

New Sexual Harassment Bill on the Horizon

If you attended our Annual Employment Law Seminar on April 12, then you already know that the ways in which employers deal with sexual harassment is changing. Even if you didn’t attend, you probably have a sense that the cultural attitude towards sexual harassment is changing. This is primarily due to movements like #MeToo and #TimesUp that are striving to bring attention and accountability to issues of sexual harassment. Continue reading

Employer Liability for Employee Injuries In the Company’s Gym

Health-and-wellness benefits are all the rage. Some employers offer their employees a discount on gym memberships. Some offer a monthly stipend to be used towards the fees at a health-club. And some have an on-site fitness center.

Employers who are considering building an on-site fitness center for employees commonly want to know how they can protect themselves against a personal-injury lawsuit. For example, an employee drops a dumbbell on his foot and breaks a toe. (Don’t laugh, people, broken toes are brutal!) Continue reading

Employee Theft Is More Common than You May Realize

theftNearly 60% of terminated or  laid off employees steal proprietary company data when leaving, says a new study released by the Ponemon Institute, an Arizona-based research company.  Most employees take hard copies or paper documents but they also admit to downloading and saving data and sending information as attachments to personal emails. Continue reading

Delaware Employers Face a Rising Obesity Rate*

apple, redDelaware has the 17th highest rate of adult obesity in the country, with more than one in four adults classified as obese, according to a new report by the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Employers bear many of the indirect costs of this obesity rate, including higher disability costs, more sick days, and increased workers’ compensation claims. The report indicated that Delaware’s obesity rate increased significantly in the past three years—a sign that current health and wellness policies aren’t cutting it. Continue reading

Is Your Workplace Psychologically Healthy?

Bullying in the workplace has been on the employment radar for several years, now.  But what exactly bullying is, on the other hand, remains elusive and without a universal definition.  The American Psychological Association (APA), has provided a way to come close, though. image

Each year, the APA sponsors the Psychologically Healthy Workplace Award program.  The award program recognizes employers who excel in five categories.  When a workplace can implement each of the five, it qualifies not just as a “good place to work,” but as a psychologically healthy workplace.  

The five types of workplace practices that contribute to a psychologically healthy work environment include: (1) work-life balance; (2) employee involvement; (3) employee growth and development; (4) health and safety; and (5) employee recognition.  These factors mirror those most commonly cited as the most important drivers for employee engagement, as well. 

Employers interested in reducing health-care costs, improving quality and productivity, and positioning their organizations for recruitment and retention of the best employees can learn more at the APA’s website.