Marriage Equality and the FMLA

The Supreme Court’s 2013 ruling in United States v. Windsor created a lot of uncertainty in the area of federal employment benefits. Because the federal government’s definition of marriage as being between one man and one woman was held to be unconstitutional, the decision left open the question of when same-sex couples were eligible for spousal benefits in a variety of contexts. In a move that is sure to simplify issues for multi-state employers, the Department of Labor is taking steps to clarify that issue under the Family & Medical Leave Act (FMLA). Continue reading

Delaware Mini-COBRA Law Grows

Editor’s Note:  This post was written by Timothy J. Snyder, Esq.  Tim is the Chair of Young Conaway’s Tax, Trusts and Estates, and Employee Benefits Sections.

Delaware’s Mini-COBRA law, enacted in May 2012, allows qualified individuals who work for employers with fewer than 20 employees to continue their coverage at their own cost, for up to 9 months after termination of coverage.  Continue reading

The Immediate Impact of the DOMA Ruling for Delaware Employers

Delaware began issuing marriage licenses to gay couples on July 1, 2013, less than a week after the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision striking down the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). Delaware will no longer perform civil unions pursuant to the Civil Union Equality Act, which was passed into law in 2010. Couples who entered into a civil union prior to July 1 may convert their civil union into a legally recognized marriage or wait until July 1, 2014, when all remaining civil unions will be automatically converted. Continue reading

In the U.S. Unlawfully But Eligible for Workers’ Comp?

Is an employee who is in the country illegally a covered “employee” under the Workers’ Compensation laws? That was the question of first impression presented to the Delaware Superior Court in Del. Valley Field Servs. v. Ramirez, (PDF) No. 12A-01-007-JOH (Sep. 13, 2012). The court concluded that the answer is “yes,” and ordered that the former employee, who has since been deported to Honduras, is eligible to receive benefits under Delaware’s workers-compensation statute. Continue reading

Same-Sex Civil Unions Recognized in Delaware

Delaware_Capitol_Hill_color_3The Delaware House of Representatives voted yesterday in favor of Senate Bill 30, a bill that would create same-sex civil unions in Delaware, and recognize civil unions performed in other states. The bill also changes all sections of the Delaware Code where marriage is mentioned, by requiring that the word “marriage” be read to mean “marriage or civil union.”  Continue reading

Benefit Limitations Remain Unchanged from 2009 to 2011

If you were hoping to be able to sock away more money into your 401(K) Plan in 2011 than you did in 2011, fuggedaboutit! The maximum elective deferrals for 2011 remains the same as it was for 2009 and 2010 — $16,500. The catch-up contribution limitation for those who are at least age 50 during 2011 is also unchanged at $5,500. The annual limit on compensation remains at $245,000, the defined contribution limit on contributions remains at $49,000 and the maximum benefit payable from a defined benefit remains at the lesser of 100% of compensation or $195,000.

Congress established the method by which the IRS determines the inflation adjusted annual benefit plan limitations. However, it seems like bad public policy to limit amounts that will be payable to employees upon retirement by the current cost of living increases, especially when the stock market is performing sluggishly.

Look for the complete listing of the adjustments to the benefit limitations when we publish our 2011 Benefits Update Card, a link to which will be posted on this blog.

*This post was written by Timothy J. Snyder, Esq.  Tim is the Chair of Young Conaway’s Tax, Trusts and Estates, and Employee Benefits Sections.