EEOC Sees Uptick in Sexual Harassment Charges, Lawsuits Filed in 2018

eeoc_3As the #MeToo movement reaches its first anniversary this year, we have been reflecting on what a dynamic year it has been for employment law. It’s almost hard to believe that it has only been one year since the earth-shattering allegations against Harvey Weinstein were made public, catalyzing the movement.  Perhaps unsurprisingly, one of the biggest effects of the #MeToo movement has been an increase in the number of sexual harassment charges and lawsuits filed in 2018.  A similar swell was seen in the year following the Anita Hill hearings, as Clarence Thomas was confirmed to the U.S. Supreme Court. Continue reading

Paid Leave 2.0: Why Some Companies are Paying Their Workers to Quit

ca$h moneyHave you ever started a job and realized that it was not what you thought it would be? Or have you ever hired someone who seemed like a perfect fit in the interview and then was a total dud when they were on the job? Most of us have.  But in a novel approach, some companies have taken charge and started to pay their employees to quit. Continue reading

Starbucks’ Racial Bias Training

StarbsTraining seems to be all the rage these days. From a possible new bill here in Delaware that would require sexual harassment training for employers with more than 50 employees, to implicit bias training, it seems that employers are realizing that the old standards of training aren’t enough. This has come about for many reasons. Continue reading

New Sexual Harassment Bill on the Horizon

If you attended our Annual Employment Law Seminar on April 12, then you already know that the ways in which employers deal with sexual harassment is changing. Even if you didn’t attend, you probably have a sense that the cultural attitude towards sexual harassment is changing. This is primarily due to movements like #MeToo and #TimesUp that are striving to bring attention and accountability to issues of sexual harassment. Continue reading

#tbt: Quit Oversharing

On Thursdays we will be sharing some of our favorite articles here. Whether it’s a topic that we still think is relevant or just one that we especially liked, we hope these throwbacks will provide an insightful look at Employment Law. Here is a post called “Quit Oversharing” originally published in 2014.

Supervisors and their direct reports are not equals.  If you are a supervisor, I advise that you keep this golden rule in mind.  When you are required to communicate a decision to your subordinate, understand that communicating does not mean “explaining.”  Employees do not want to hear the full story behind the decision. Continue reading

Management Monday: Quit Oversharing

Supervisors and their direct reports are not equals.  If you are a supervisor, I advise that you keep this golden rule in mind.  When you are required to communicate a decision to your subordinate, understand that communicating does not mean “explaining.”  Employees do not want to hear the full story behind the decision. telling secrets_thumb

You are not your employees’ equal.  You are the boss.  And, as the boss, your employees count on you to be the one who holds the ship together.  By over-explaining the reasons for a decision, by seeming too apologetic, you have failed your employees.

This does not mean that you must be aloof and reserved.  But it does mean that you should quit oversharing.  When you try to explain the behind-the-scenes politics, you confuse employees and lead them to believe that there are unanswered questions within the organization.  This can be a costly endeavor.

Employees with doubt emanate their doubt  and doubt is contagious and infectious.  We all have our crosses to bear-supervisors should not share the burden of their own crosses with their subordinates.  Subordinates want their bosses to be in control, to have the answers.

Of course, it’s rare that we, as supervisors, do have all of the answers.  But it is our job, as supervisors, not to reveal this inevitable fact.  Instead, it is our job, as supervisors, to put on the brave face of control and act as if everything is under control.

Sometimes, the “full-disclosure” route is very much the wrong route.  We, as supervisors, fix problems, not merely share the weight of those problems.  Supervisors should keep in mind this mantra the next time desire the need to share the burden of responsibility.  Don’t do it.  Seek advice from your higher ups.  But do not shoulder the burden with your direct subordinate.  Not, that is, if you want to keep your position and any semblance of true authority.

Trainees as Trainers: In Support of Involving Employees In Their Own Training

I’ve posted several times before on the link between employee engagement and workplace training and development.   I believe there is a direct correlation between job satisfaction and the amount of regular, interactive, and applicable training employees are given.  And, the better and more relevant the training, the better and more engaged the employees.  Well-executed training in the right subject matter is key to retaining key employees.  It’s also essential to attracting and satisfying Gen Y employeesclassroom

I also believe that one of the best ways to encourage and engage the best of your best employees is to let them train themselves.  Or train each other, really.  By getting employees to participate in the selection of the topic and the presentation of the subject matter to their co-workers, a great deal can be gained.  (See my previous post on this very issue, Training as an Employee Perk? Yes, really).

Training Time pointed me to a post by Jim Giuliano at HR Morning, which reaches the same brilliant conclusion.  Here’s the story as summarized by Training Time:

  • During the recruiting process, people are told that the company is dedicated to continual learning and development, using training to reach career goals.
  • Supervisors and HR don’t have enough time to come up with new training ideas relevant to the goals of the employee and company.
  • The company can’t afford to hire a professional training coordinator.

What to do?  HR Training recommends turning employees into their own training coordinators.  I’d add to that: turn employees into trainers, too.  And I’d venture to say that you’ve got a winning workplace.