Lessons from a Shooting Close to Home

Delaware experienced a tragedy yesterday at the New Castle County courthouse. As reported by ABCNews.com, a man embroiled in a custody dispute entered the courthouse lobby this morning shortly after 8 a.m. and opened fire, fatally wounding two women and injuring two Capital Police officers. The shooter exchanged gunfire with the officers and died at the scene. Continue reading

Guns In the Workplace: Implications of Open-Carry Laws

Prof. Stephen Bainbridge makes a great argument against state laws that permit employees to store guns in their cars. In his post, Guns vs. At-Will Employment, Prof. Bainbridge discusses a recent decision by the Kentucky Supreme Court interpreting that state’s gun laws. In its opinion, the Court found that an employee who was fired for having a handgun in his car (for which he had proper license), could bring a wrongful-termination suit against his employer, the University of Kentucky. Prof. Bainbridge concludes that these state laws constitute a significant and problematic exception to the employment-at-will doctrine.

On McAfee & Taft’s EmployerLinc blog, Charlie Plumb recently wrote about a new law in Oklahoma that raises similar issues. “Concealed-carry laws” also took effect last year in Wisconsin and Texas.

Guns At Work: Impact Update

handgunRoughly six months have gone by since guns-at-work laws were passed in Georgia and Florida.  I posted previously about the legislative initiatives in both states.  (See Georgia Takes One Step Backwards in the Fight Against Workplace Violence; Florida Law Permits Guns at Work; Delaware Initiates an Anti-Workplace Violence Training Program).  John Phillips, at The Word on Employment Law, has done an excellent job following up on similar efforts in other states.   He posted yesterday about the direct impact that these guns-at-work laws can have–for employers, its armed, and unarmed employees, and its clients and customers.  In the post, John writes about a Starbucks employee who was shut in the leg while working.  The employee was not only the victim in this case–he was also the shooter.  He shot himself while working with a gun he’d brought to work.  See John’s post for more details and a discussion of the potentially far ranging implications that these new laws can have for employers and employees.

July 29: Guns in the Workplace Webinar

Lou Michels and Halima Horton of McGuire Woods will be presenting a free webinar about state gun laws that prohibit employers from outlawing firearms on company property–including employee-owned guns kept in personal vehicles.  This is a topic we’ve covered here a number of times and are likely to hear more about as incidents of workplace violence continue to occur across the country.  I’d encourage you to take advantage of this free, 1-hour program.  It is scheduled for July 29th at 12:30 EDT and you can register online. Continue reading

Employee Shooting Results in Unusual Liability for Workplace Violence

alcohol-and-violence-thumbA preventative workplace violence strategy can be an important best practice.  As we’ve previously discussed in a post about what employers can learn when violence hits close to home, employers also should have a real strategy for the “during” and “after” of a workplace violence incident.  One common prevention tool popular among employers today is the Employee-Assistance Provider (EAP).  Considered by many to be an effective way to intervene before little troubles become big problems, EAPs have enjoyed increased popularity over the past several years. Continue reading