Court Finds Duty to Preserve Personal Emails of Employees

The modern workplace presents a cornucopia of problems thanks to technology.  As much as employers may want to restrict employees from surfing the Internet or checking Facebook during working time, it’s nearly impossible.  After all, employees can just use their personal cellphones to get online.  Add to that reality the fact the growing popularity of BYOD policies. Continue reading

Kansas Court Mitigates the Risks of a BYOD Workforce

BYOD at work is all the rage. What is BYOD, exactly? Well, it stands for “Bring Your Own Device” and, put simply, it means that an employee uses his own smartphone, tablet, or laptop for work as well as for his personal purposes.  BYOD policies raise several concerns, including increased security risks and wage-and-hour issues for work performed at home.  Another issue is one of particular interest to litigators like me-the question of how BYOD policies will affect e-discovery.  In other words, will an employer be on the hook for the preservation of its employees’ personal devices if those devices are used for work and for personal purposes? Continue reading

Employees and the Burdens of Being Beautiful

Being beautiful ain’t all it’s cracked up to be.  Or so it seems from the legal-news headlines.

First, there are the “Borgata Babes.”  The female cocktail servers at Borgata Hotel and Casino in Atlantic City, known as Borgata Babes, challenged the legality of their employer’s policy prohibiting them from gaining more than 7% of their body weight after they were hired.  The Babes lost the lawsuit, though, when a New Jersey judge granted Borgata’s motion for summary judgment. Continue reading

Your Employees Are Stealing Your Data

Employee resigns. But before her last day of work, Employee copies thousands of emails and documents from Employer’s computer.  Off goes Employee into the sunset.

How often is this scenario?  I bet most employers think this never happens in their workplace. I’d be willing to bet that it happens in almost every workplace.  It happens with such regularity, yet most employers are absolutely stunned to discover that it’s happened to them. Continue reading

Lessons from a Shooting Close to Home

Delaware experienced a tragedy yesterday at the New Castle County courthouse. As reported by ABCNews.com, a man embroiled in a custody dispute entered the courthouse lobby this morning shortly after 8 a.m. and opened fire, fatally wounding two women and injuring two Capital Police officers. The shooter exchanged gunfire with the officers and died at the scene. Continue reading

DOT Regs vs. Lawful Marijuana Use

Medical-marijuana laws have been passed in several states. Although Delaware passed a law permitting medicinal use of marijuana, implementation was blunted by potential prosecution by the federal government. And, last month, Colorado and Washington voters made recreational use of marijuana legal in those states. Both medical- and recreational-marijuana-use laws raise lots of questions for employers. Continue reading

A Hurricane’s a Coming!

Hurricane Sandy is heading right for Delaware; Gov. Markell announced a state of emergency earlier today. The hurricane is forecasted to be the second worst in recorded history. Our neighbors in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland are facing similarly treacherous weather conditions in the coming days. In light of the anticipated power outages, it’s likely that things on the blog will be quiet for the next few days.
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Until then, here are some of our previous posts on emergency preparedness for employers: Continue reading

An HR Lesson from the Presidential Debate

I never discuss politics. Never. I don’t have the stomach for it, to be honest, and I avoid the subject like the plague. That said, I did manage to watch part of the Presidential Debate on Tuesday night. There are ample pundits who surely have more insightful (i.e., political) commentary than what I can offer. So I’ll gladly leave the politics to others and stick with what I know–employment law. Here’s one HR-related lesson that I took away from the debate. Continue reading