McDonald’s says #MeToo

Macky D'sThe news has primarily focused on the effects of the #MeToo movement in high-profile industries. The numerous falls from grace of once-prominent men (and occasionally women) in politics, comedy, and film have percolated throughout news cycles for the last twelve months. Often, the women reporting the harassment or assault had their careers stunted or completely derailed by their harassers, typically (but not universally) men who were in a position of power. But on September 18 a group of women who have been previously largely overlooked came forward. Fast-food workers from McDonald’s chains in ten different cities went on strike to protest both the sexual harassment they endure, and the indifference with which their complaints are met. Continue reading

Recently Enacted Delaware Layoff Notification Law Imposes New Requirements on Delaware Employers

By Scott A. Holt

This article was updated on August 17, 2018

Effective January 7, 2019, Delaware private employers will need to comply with a new state law requiring 60 days advanced notice to affected employees and government officials of a mass layoff, plant closing or relocation. The new law, known as the Delaware Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act (“Delaware WARN”), mirrors in many respects the federal Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act (WARN). The Delaware WARN, however, differs from the federal WARN Act in four critical ways.   Continue reading

Just When You Thought It Was Safe to Go Back in the Water…

The Third Circuit has updated its decision on transgender bathroom policies, which we discussed previously here. The precedential opinion, which was filed on June 18, was revised on July 26 to take a softer stance on whether the decision to require transgender students to use separate, single-stall bathrooms violates federal law. The same panel that issued the original decision issued the revised decision and denied allowing the case to be reheard with a full court. The attorneys for the students have two weeks to renew their request. The attorneys argue that the first ruling—among other things—conflated gender and sex, and ignored long-standing precedent regarding sexual harassment and bodily privacy. This case is a contentious one, with Circuit Judge Kent A. Jordan, joined by Judges Michael Chagares, Thomas Hardiman, and Stephanos Bibas, writing a strongly worded dissent recommending that the Third Circuit rehear the case en banc, meaning that every judge sitting on the appellate court would be asked to hear and rule on the matter.  We will monitor the situation and keep you apprised of any updates to this case.

 

Change to Educator Discipline: An Update to Title 14 Chapter 12 of the Delaware Code

On July 11, Governor Carney signed a bill that changes Title 14, Chapter 12 of the Delaware Code and updates how educators in Delaware are reprimanded in certain instances. State employees who are involved in discipline of teachers, and teachers themselves, should become familiar with the slight, but important, changes that have gone into effect. Continue reading

Sexual Harassment Training Now Mandated: An Update on the Passage of House Bill 360

On June 12, 2018 House Bill 360 (HB360) was substituted in the House by House Substitute 1(HS1). It was voted out of Committee on June 20 and the final bill was passed on July 1 by the General Assembly. The final bill that passed had an amendment that changed some of the wording, which we discuss below. This bill will take effect on January 1, 2019. In the meantime, we have broken down the most significant differences between the original bill and its substitute. Continue reading

Big Legislative Takeaways for Delaware

Saturday June 30 (and into the wee hours of Sunday July 1) saw the end of the fiscal year and with it came midnight and last minute (literally) deals in the Delaware General Assembly. Here were some of the biggest takeaways that will affect employment law: Continue reading

New Sexual Harassment Bill on the Horizon

If you attended our Annual Employment Law Seminar on April 12, then you already know that the ways in which employers deal with sexual harassment is changing. Even if you didn’t attend, you probably have a sense that the cultural attitude towards sexual harassment is changing. This is primarily due to movements like #MeToo and #TimesUp that are striving to bring attention and accountability to issues of sexual harassment. Continue reading