Sexual Harassment Training Now Mandated: An Update on the Passage of House Bill 360

On June 12, 2018 House Bill 360 (HB360) was substituted in the House by House Substitute 1(HS1). It was voted out of Committee on June 20 and the final bill was passed on July 1 by the General Assembly. The final bill that passed had an amendment that changed some of the wording, which we discuss below. This bill will take effect on January 1, 2019. In the meantime, we have broken down the most significant differences between the original bill and its substitute. Continue reading

Big Legislative Takeaways for Delaware

Saturday June 30 (and into the wee hours of Sunday July 1) saw the end of the fiscal year and with it came midnight and last minute (literally) deals in the Delaware General Assembly. Here were some of the biggest takeaways that will affect employment law: Continue reading

New Sexual Harassment Bill on the Horizon

If you attended our Annual Employment Law Seminar on April 12, then you already know that the ways in which employers deal with sexual harassment is changing. Even if you didn’t attend, you probably have a sense that the cultural attitude towards sexual harassment is changing. This is primarily due to movements like #MeToo and #TimesUp that are striving to bring attention and accountability to issues of sexual harassment. Continue reading

Foul Ball: Court Reverses Workers’ Comp Decision

softballWorkers’ compensation is a tough game, and it spares no one. But a recent decision from the Delaware Superior Court reminds us that there are some limits to when an employer can be held responsible for injuries occurring in out-of-office, work-sponsored events.  Catch the details below. Continue reading

Right-to-work: Right or Wrong?

Recently there has been a lot of talk in Delaware regarding right-to-work laws.

When a private-sector company is organized, the union will try to negotiate a requirement that all employees either join the union and pay union dues or pay a so-called agency fee for the services provided by the union like negotiations and grievance processing. The National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) authorizes individual states to outlaw this practice.  Any state who passes such a law is called a “right-to-work state.”

Delaware, like 21 other states, is not a right-to-work state. Delaware Governor Carney wants Delaware to stay that way. Continue reading

Keepin’ It In the (Blog) Family

Employers have more resources than ever when it comes to employment-related questions. The Internet is chock full of fantastic references for all things employment law. This blog was selected as one of the best in the country by the ABA Journal for the third time this year (thanks, ABA Journal!!), along with several other terrific employment-law blogs. There’s a connection between this blog and some of the other winners this year, though, that deserves my attention. Continue reading