(FMLA) Form Over Function

New FMLA forms appear to be around the corner. In 2008, the U.S. Department of Labor issued a set of forms, which were intended to assist employers in reviewing and granting requests for leave under the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA). Updated forms have been submitted to the federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), but have not yet been approved. Continue reading

3d Cir. Finds Individual Supervisor Liable Under FMLA

Can an individual supervisor be held liable when an employee files suit? Well, like all legal questions, it depends. The Third Circuit Court of Appeals issued an opinion yesterday expanding the instances when the answer to this question is yes in Haybarger v. Lawrence County Adult Probation & Parole, No. 10-3916 (3d Cir. Jan. 31, 2012). Continue reading

3d Cir: No FMLA Protection for Employees Who Lie

The FMLA requires an employee to receive (unpaid) leave for certain family and medical reasons. Employers must provide certain notices to employees, determine employees’ eligibility for FMLA leave, and track leave time in accordance with the FMLA’s complex regulations. A recent opinion from the Third Circuit, though, makes clear that the employer isn’t the only one obligated to follow the FMLA’s many rules. Continue reading

Who’s Your Daddy? Under the FMLA, It’s a Tough Question

Maury Povich has made a good living hosting a TV show which often focuses on determining paternity. The show follows a familiar pattern. A woman comes on and declares that a man, waiting back stage, is the father of her baby. The child is then shown on the screen for the audience in the studio and at home to adore. The putative father is then marched onstage to loud boos. Continue reading

New FMLA Regulations Restrict Substitution of Paid Leave for FMLA

3d_man_sick_with_red_crossThe substitution of paid leave for unpaid FMLA leave occurs often.  A employee eligible for FMLA leave will substitute accrued vacation, sick, medical, or other similar types of paid leave so that he avoids a loss of pay during the leave.  In most circumstances, employers also benefit because, when substitution occurs, the time counts against both the employee’s FMLA and paid time off entitlements. Continue reading