Winter Woes: Employment Discrimination Via Facebook

3d man with thermometer in cold weather_thumbDo employers search social-media sites, like Facebook and Twitter, before hiring a potential employee?  Yes.  Like it or not, they do.  Sometimes as part of an official screening process but, more often than not, the act of Googling is simply second nature and is done without any advance planning or thought.

And, as a result of these online searches, do employers screen out candidates for unlawful reasons, such as race, religion, or pregnancy?  Yes, says the results of a recent survey reported by the Wall Street Journal. Continue reading

EEOC Ordered to Pay Big Fees for Pursuing Criminal-History Suit

The EEOC suffered another defeat this week, being ordered again to pay the fees and costs incurred by an employer after the EEOC’s claims turned out to be without merit.  IN EEOC v. Peoplemark, Inc., A split 6th Circuit affirmed an award of approximately $750,000 in fees and costs incurred by a temp agency in defending against one of the EEOC’s criminal-history cases.  The EEOC contended that the temp agency’s company-wide policy barring employment to individuals with felony records had a disparate impact on Black candidates.Fees letterpress_3

The temp agency, PeopleMark, had offices in five states.  In 2005, a Black candidate, Sherri Scott filed a Charge of Discrimination, alleging that she had been denied employment because she had a felony conviction.  In fact, Scott had two felony convictions and had been released from prison less than a month before she applied for a job with PeopleMark.

And it gets worse. Continue reading

Give Me Some Credit! EEOC Credit-Check Case Dismissed

“Give Me Some Credit!” Maybe that’s how the EEOC feels these days, after its high-profile suit against Kaplan Higher Education Corp. was dismissed on January 28, 2013. As readers may remember, the EEOC sued Kaplan in 2010, alleging that its pre-employment credit check policies had a disparate impact upon Black job applicants. Continue reading

Wilmington Joins the Ban-the-Box Bandwagon

criminal_backgroundEmployers’ Ban-the-Box initiatives are taking hold in many states and municipalities. The City of Wilmington has joined the ranks of employers no longer requiring information on an applicant’s criminal history at the time of job application. Mayor Baker signed an executive order on Monday that removes a question about criminal convictions from city job applications.

 

According to Mayor Baker, the city will now conduct criminal background checks only on applicants who have received a conditional job offer. Public safety jobs in the police and fire departments are the only positions excluded from the order. Continue reading

In the U.S. Unlawfully But Eligible for Workers’ Comp?

Is an employee who is in the country illegally a covered “employee” under the Workers’ Compensation laws? That was the question of first impression presented to the Delaware Superior Court in Del. Valley Field Servs. v. Ramirez, (PDF) No. 12A-01-007-JOH (Sep. 13, 2012). The court concluded that the answer is “yes,” and ordered that the former employee, who has since been deported to Honduras, is eligible to receive benefits under Delaware’s workers-compensation statute. Continue reading

Fighting Back: Bullies and Obesity

Some people are real jerks. Anyone who deals with the general public for a living knows that this is an indisputable fact. For those who work in sales or service positions know that the theory “the customer is always right” can be a bitter pill to swallow. Every waiter, store clerk, and receptionist has had a moment where they had to swallow very hard to resist firing back at an irate and/or irrational customer who’s decided to take out his or her frustrations on whoever happens to be in their line of vision. Most of the time, it is not possible or not wise to fight back.

But, sometimes, it is. Continue reading