Give Me Some Credit! EEOC Credit-Check Case Dismissed

“Give Me Some Credit!” Maybe that’s how the EEOC feels these days, after its high-profile suit against Kaplan Higher Education Corp. was dismissed on January 28, 2013. As readers may remember, the EEOC sued Kaplan in 2010, alleging that its pre-employment credit check policies had a disparate impact upon Black job applicants. Continue reading

Wilmington Joins the Ban-the-Box Bandwagon

criminal_backgroundEmployers’ Ban-the-Box initiatives are taking hold in many states and municipalities. The City of Wilmington has joined the ranks of employers no longer requiring information on an applicant’s criminal history at the time of job application. Mayor Baker signed an executive order on Monday that removes a question about criminal convictions from city job applications.

 

According to Mayor Baker, the city will now conduct criminal background checks only on applicants who have received a conditional job offer. Public safety jobs in the police and fire departments are the only positions excluded from the order. Continue reading

In the U.S. Unlawfully But Eligible for Workers’ Comp?

Is an employee who is in the country illegally a covered “employee” under the Workers’ Compensation laws? That was the question of first impression presented to the Delaware Superior Court in Del. Valley Field Servs. v. Ramirez, (PDF) No. 12A-01-007-JOH (Sep. 13, 2012). The court concluded that the answer is “yes,” and ordered that the former employee, who has since been deported to Honduras, is eligible to receive benefits under Delaware’s workers-compensation statute. Continue reading

Fighting Back: Bullies and Obesity

Some people are real jerks. Anyone who deals with the general public for a living knows that this is an indisputable fact. For those who work in sales or service positions know that the theory “the customer is always right” can be a bitter pill to swallow. Every waiter, store clerk, and receptionist has had a moment where they had to swallow very hard to resist firing back at an irate and/or irrational customer who’s decided to take out his or her frustrations on whoever happens to be in their line of vision. Most of the time, it is not possible or not wise to fight back.

But, sometimes, it is. Continue reading

How to Nail Your Law-Firm Interview

I take very seriously the job of interviewing potential candidates. There are certain things that a candidate can do or say to sabotage their chances at getting an offer. Many of these “offer killers” are more common than you might think. Many of the lawyers I’ve talked with have expressed frustration about similar behaviors from the candidates they’ve interviewed. In an effort to help future candidates, I humbly suggest some things to avoid. Continue reading

The Inherently Dangerous Nature of Selling on a Street Corner

Independent contractor or employee? It’s a hot question these days, for sure. A recent decision from the Delaware Superior Court answers the question in an unusual way–yes and no. In Colon v. Gannet Co., Inc.,
No. N10C-04-007-MMJ (Del. Super. July 26, 2012), the court held that the plaintiff was an independent contractor but that the employer still could be found liable for harm caused to him during the course of his work. Continue reading

Delaware Adds Public Shame to Its Arsenal of Weapons to Fight Misclassification

make you feel smallEmployers in the construction industry should, by now, be painfully aware of the Delaware Workplace Fraud Act, signed into law in 2009. The Act imposes stiff penalties on construction-services employers who misclassify employees as “independent contractors.”

As a result of amendments signed into law on July 12, 2012 (HB 222.pdf), the General Assembly has added more teeth to the law, in the form of public shame. Now, the name of any employer that has violated the Workplace Fraud Act will be posted on the Department of Labor’s website for a period of 3 years from the date of the final determination. Continue reading

Password-Privacy Bill Approved by N.J. Assembly

The New Jersey Assembly passed that State’s version of a password-privacy law yesterday by a vote of 77-0. The Bill, AB 2878, is now sent to the State’s Senate, reports NJ.com. Much like the Delaware Workplace Privacy Act, which currently is pending in the Delaware House of Representatives, the New Jersey Bill has some significant flaws. Continue reading

Taking the Mystery Out of Bad Hiring Practices

Want some free anti-harassment and anti-discrimination training? Well, have I got a deal for you! Mystery Diners is a reality show on the Food Network. The show’s concept involves a father-daughter team who pretend to be employees and/or customers at a target restaurant in order to help the owner uncover the “leaks in the dam” so to speak.

An episode that aired last week, called, “Managing Disaster,” could be used as a workplace best-practices training video. In short, you could use the video to train employees that any of the conduct by the restaurant’s manager should be considered prohibited conduct in your workplace. Continue reading