Delaware Passes Gender-Identity Anti-Discrimination Law

Delaware’s employment-law landscape has been in flux in recent months. In addition to the Supreme Court’s recent decisions affecting employment law, Delaware also passed a law prohibiting employment and other types of discrimination on the basis of an individual’s gender identity. Here is what Delaware employers need to know about the new statute. Continue reading

U.S.S.C. Clarifies the Applicable Standard for Retaliation Claims

In United Texas Southwestern Medical Center v. Nassar, the Supreme Court ruled that the anti-retaliation provision of Title VII requires “but-for” causation. In other words, an unlawful reason has to be the reason for the adverse employment action. The Supreme Court had previously ruled that this type of “but-for” causation also is required in cases alleging age discrimination. Continue reading

No, I am not from the Midwest. Sex Discrimination Lives On.

Gender discrimination happens. Let’s not pretend that it doesn’t. I have not, in my short life as a lawyer, ever felt that I was not getting the same opportunities as my male counterparts. But I don’t pretend that it doesn’t happen. Recently, I had an interaction with a senior lawyer from an out-of-state firm that reminded me how lucky I am. Continue reading

What Is Good for the Goose . . . Employers Oppose Federally Mandated Inequality

The United States Supreme Court will hear argument next month in United States v. Windsor, which addresses the constitutionality of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA).  Nearly 300 private-sector employers joined forces in opposition to the law, filing a joint amici brief.  Among the employers who oppose the law are Citigroup, Google, Facebook, and Starbucks, reports the L.A. Times.goose_thumb

The employers voice a number of objections to the law, all arising from the conflict between state and federal law.  Twelve states and the District of Columbia now recognize same-sex marriages.  But federal law, pursuant to DOMA, prohibits the recognition of same-sex unions. Continue reading

Manager’s Drunk Facebook Post Leads to Retaliation Claim

Readers may recall the case, Stewart v. CUS Nashville, LLC, which is one of the few opinions on the discoverability of a party’s social-media account. There were at least a couple of interesting issues in that decision but the most interesting part may be that the defendant is the entity that owns and operates Coyote Ugly Saloons. That’s right–the one from the movie, where hot bartenders dance on the bar. Continue reading

I Believe, I Believe! A Vegan and a Flu Shot

Can an employee be required to get a flu shot? Employers want a healthy workforce and, presumably, employees do not want to be sick. So a flu shot seems like a good idea. And an offer of a free flu shot for employees seems like a great perk.

But the goodwill-nature of a suggestion always seems to change when a suggestion turns into a requirement. Maybe it’s just the rebellious teenager in all of us that reacts negatively to being told that we must do something. Maybe we all have authority issues. I don’t know what it is about being ordered to do something that seems to set off an automatic negative response. Continue reading

Don’t Be a Quitter: The Duty to Mitigate

An employee who is unlawfully terminated may be entitled to recover damages in a variety of forms, including front pay. Front pay can be a frightening prospect for the employer-defendant–just imagine having to pay a former employee for time he doesn’t work for you. Not pleasant.duty to mitigate damages

But, as is the case in most employment laws, the rules tend to balance out in a fair way. An employee who claims she was unlawfully terminated because of her gender cannot merely sit at home indefinitely and wait to collect a big jury award. The law imposes what is called a “duty to mitigate,” which means that the employee has the duty to mitigate her losses. Continue reading

Who Says I’m a Girly Man? Doth Sayeth the EEOC

The EEOC has enjoyed several victories in recent months. For example, the EEOC was granted summary judgment in a hostile-environment claim filed on behalf of a class of black construction workers. Even more recently, the EEOC was awarded summary judgment in an age-discrimination lawsuit against the City of Baltimore. But things haven’t been all peaches and cream for the EEOC. Continue reading