Maternity, Paternity, Furternity?

PupperThe competition between companies attempting to attract and keep qualified workers has taken an interesting turn. The Minneapolis-based marketing firm Nina Hale recently added “Fur-ternity Leave” to their list of benefits.  The company is now allowing employees a week to work from home after they adopt a new cat or dog, so that the animal can adjust to the new home environment. Continue reading

Quitting Is for Quitters: And It Leads to Liability

Chief Executive of CBS Leslie Moonves stepped down on Sunday after a second article appeared in the New Yorker detailing allegations of sexual misconduct. When the first article came out, CBS agreed to look into the allegations but kept Moonves around while the investigations could take place. When six new women came forward with disturbing allegations, Moonves finally stepped down. Continue reading

Life after Epic Systems: Almost 3000 Workers Are Dropped from Chipotle’s Wage Suit

chipotle picWhen the Supreme Court ruled on Epic Systems v. Lewis on May 21, 2018, they altered how cases involving collective action would play out. We are currently seeing the results of the Court’s decision in the case of Turner et al v. Chipotle Mexican Grill, Inc. Continue reading

Would You Like Fries With That? Attorneys General are fighting back on behalf of fast food workers

burgerThe dreaded non-compete. The clause that is included in many employment contracts that controls employees’ work behavior once they leave their current employer. To be enforceable, these provisions almost always require a time restriction— the employee cannot engage in their line of work for a set amount of time—and a geographic restriction—the employee cannot engage in their line of work within a certain radius of their former employer. Continue reading

Just When You Thought It Was Safe to Go Back in the Water…

The Third Circuit has updated its decision on transgender bathroom policies, which we discussed previously here. The precedential opinion, which was filed on June 18, was revised on July 26 to take a softer stance on whether the decision to require transgender students to use separate, single-stall bathrooms violates federal law. The same panel that issued the original decision issued the revised decision and denied allowing the case to be reheard with a full court. The attorneys for the students have two weeks to renew their request. The attorneys argue that the first ruling—among other things—conflated gender and sex, and ignored long-standing precedent regarding sexual harassment and bodily privacy. This case is a contentious one, with Circuit Judge Kent A. Jordan, joined by Judges Michael Chagares, Thomas Hardiman, and Stephanos Bibas, writing a strongly worded dissent recommending that the Third Circuit rehear the case en banc, meaning that every judge sitting on the appellate court would be asked to hear and rule on the matter.  We will monitor the situation and keep you apprised of any updates to this case.

 

Change to Educator Discipline: An Update to Title 14 Chapter 12 of the Delaware Code

On July 11, Governor Carney signed a bill that changes Title 14, Chapter 12 of the Delaware Code and updates how educators in Delaware are reprimanded in certain instances. State employees who are involved in discipline of teachers, and teachers themselves, should become familiar with the slight, but important, changes that have gone into effect. Continue reading