2018 Annual Employment Law Seminar

Registration is now open for Young Conaway’s 2018 Annual Labor and Employment Law Seminar. The event will take place on April 12 at the Chase Center on the Riverfront. This year our speakers will be discussing the #metoo Movement, marijuana and opioids in the workplace, and other important topics related to Employment Law.

Click here to find out more about this day-long program and how to register.

We hope to see you there!

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#tbt: Quit Oversharing

On Thursdays we will be sharing some of our favorite articles here. Whether it’s a topic that we still think is relevant or just one that we especially liked, we hope these throwbacks will provide an insightful look at Employment Law. Here is a post called “Quit Oversharing” originally published in 2014.

Supervisors and their direct reports are not equals.  If you are a supervisor, I advise that you keep this golden rule in mind.  When you are required to communicate a decision to your subordinate, understand that communicating does not mean “explaining.”  Employees do not want to hear the full story behind the decision. Continue reading

Is It Time to Rethink Your Zero Tolerance Drug Policy?

By William W. Bowser

Background

In my practice, drug and alcohol issues came to the forefront in the 90’s. There was a lot of publicity then about transit workers and big rig drivers causing accidents when they were high.

The Department of Transportation (“DOT”) responded by adopting regulations 5161819684_6b310a493b_zrequiring CDL drivers to be tested for drugs under various scenarios. These scenarios included pre-employment, post-accident, and at random. Every employer with at least one CDL driver had to adopt a pretty comprehensive drug and alcohol policy.  I drafted a lot of them.

Once the CDL drivers were covered, employers started expanding the scope of these policies to cover other employees. The stated purpose was to have an efficient and productive workplace and to protect the public. Continue reading

Right-to-work: Right or Wrong?

Recently there has been a lot of talk in Delaware regarding right-to-work laws.

When a private-sector company is organized, the union will try to negotiate a requirement that all employees either join the union and pay union dues or pay a so-called agency fee for the services provided by the union like negotiations and grievance processing. The National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) authorizes individual states to outlaw this practice.  Any state who passes such a law is called a “right-to-work state.”

Delaware, like 21 other states, is not a right-to-work state. Delaware Governor Carney wants Delaware to stay that way. Continue reading

How Not to Fire High Profile Employees

By Lauren E.M. Russell

The more technological of our readers may be aware of a brouhaha involving a website named Reddit.  Reddit is best known, among the general population, for conducting structured question-and-answer sessions called Ask Me Anything (AMA), in which subjects respond to questions posted by Reddit users. The subjects of an AMA may range from the mundane (a trash man) to extremely high profile politicians, including President Obama. One Reddit employee, Victoria Taylor, was largely responsible for organizing and facilitating AMAs. She was fired in early July, and the resulting firestorm offers many lessons in what not to do when terminating a high profile employee. Continue reading

Compassionless Court Kicks Marijuana Claim

By Michael P. Stafford

Marijuana is back in the news here in Delaware. Our state’s first Compassion Center is set to open later this month and legislation decriminalizing the sacred herb has been signed into law by Governor Jack Markell.  medical marijuana_3

Delaware is by no means unique-it is part of a national trend towards decriminalization and even legalization occurring at the state level across the nation. However, as far as the federal government is concerned, marijuana remains illegal. Essentially, America is becoming a veritable patchwork quilt of differing, and inconsistent approaches-a situation that is creating headaches for employers, particularly those with national or multi-state operations, striving for consistency and uniformity in their drug policies. Continue reading